A Large Late Roman Trail Decorated Barrel Shaped Glass Bead 4th-5th Century AD

Our featured item of the week is a large and impressive example of a Late Roman to Early Byzantine barrel shaped glass bead, appearing black, decorated in both red and yellow trails. A set of four double trails of applied red divide the bead into a series of registers, each with a thick zig-zag trail… Read More A Large Late Roman Trail Decorated Barrel Shaped Glass Bead 4th-5th Century AD

Our Object the the Week: A Merovingian Frankish Silver and Glass Buckle, Late 5th – 6th Century AD

This week we have selected a superb silver and glass buckle from Late Antiquity. This object was made at the moment in history when the Western European provinces of the Roman Empire were slipping further from centralised authority and becoming the de facto semi-barbarian kingdoms of the Franks, Visigoths, Saxons and others. Our object dates… Read More Our Object the the Week: A Merovingian Frankish Silver and Glass Buckle, Late 5th – 6th Century AD

Greek Antiquities in the British Museum, London

The recent decision by The British Museum to send a single sculpture from the famed Parthenon Marbles (or Elgin Marbles) on loan briefly to the Hermitage in Russia, causing outrage in Greece, has once again drawn attention to issues of cultural heritage relating to antiquities. Whatever the merits of the arguments put forward by those… Read More Greek Antiquities in the British Museum, London

News Item: Rich Grave Goods Point to East Anglian Royal Family

A remarkable excavation in the town of Exning, Suffolk, England may have uncovered members of the royal family of the ancient Saxon Kingdom of East Anglia. Twenty-one graves with rich grave goods, some imported from the Continent, dated to about 650 AD, point to this possible connection. Here is a link to an article about… Read More News Item: Rich Grave Goods Point to East Anglian Royal Family

Clio’s Trust for Ancient Art Facilitates Gift of Ancient Glass to Mint Museum of Art

We are pleased to announce that our Trust for Ancient Art has rounded out the year by facilitating the donation of a collection of ancient Roman glass from an anonymous Atlanta collector, acquired many years ago in Israel, to the Mint Museum of Art in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Mint had previously benefited from the… Read More Clio’s Trust for Ancient Art Facilitates Gift of Ancient Glass to Mint Museum of Art

Clear vs Iridescent: Ancient Glass Collector Preferences

There are many varieties of ancient glass, spanning over 2,500 years of production and successive cultures, available both on the legitimate antiquities market and in museum collections on view to the public. The vast majority of ancient glass is relatively colorless Roman blown glass (as opposed to core formed, rod formed, mold made, slumped, cast… Read More Clear vs Iridescent: Ancient Glass Collector Preferences